Saturday, 23 August 2014

A way in...

Friends are up visiting us from England .They have a nine year old son. The father ( who wargamed with figures at school,but not since around forty years ago) would like to get his son into historical figure gaming  as opposed to fantasy. I said I would have a think for ideas/a way in.
.I am thinking of rules  etc etc
Any thoughts gentlemen?

15 comments:

  1. I would keep it very simple to start off with - Featherstone - Grant or Charge maybe , Tony

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    1. +1 on that idea.... rules from Battles with Model Soldiers should do it nicely...

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  2. The Age of Chivalry and Osprey publish Dan Mersey's 'Lion Rampart' rules in four weeks. Hollywood and history combined; it appeals to this elderly lad!
    Loads of information and play tests if you Google, and lots on Boardgamegeek.

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  3. First find out what period the lad might be interested in. It won't help if he doesn't care about the period. Does he like Knights or Battleships or Vikings or Biplanes or "Green Army Men" or what?

    The Junior General has numerous simple rules for different periods and paper figures for quick and simple introductions.

    Also, if the lad likes to read, I'd encourage the Dad to get him some Henty historical novels (used book stores should have some) . . . they make a good lead into gaming. Also there are some excellent movies more most periods, which again can kindle an interest.

    And, of course, something like DBA makes for a good starter game when they are ready for "real" figures.


    -- Jeff

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  4. I would avoid the introduction my own kids took, which was via Games Workshop because the Lord of the Rings movies were popular at the time.
    Simpler the better would be my advice. As Jeff says, find out what period the lad is interested in and find some nice large plastic figures, avoid painting for now unless he's keen to try it, and let him have fun with some simple battles. Hopefully dad will also rediscover the pleasure of playing with model soldiers and they will encourage each other.

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  5. Alan, my suggestion would be a medieval (knights) skirmish scenario resembling an setting that might already be familiar from fiction. Robin Hood? Do you have a castle? Robin and his band rescue Maid Marian from the rotten Sheriff...

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  6. I cannot recommend either Battlecry or Memoir 44 strongly enough. Both are self contained, come with everything you need and are aimed at that age group. Memoir 44 was specifically aimed at the 7+ bracket with the idea that it would offer children a chance to learn a little about the landings.

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  7. I agree, find a period the lad's interested in and use simple rules. Above all, make it fun!

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  8. I agree with Jeff and AJ and Michael. Start with the kid's own interests, and keep it simple to start with, simple rules, not too many figures. A quick and fun game that appeals to his own interests should be the way to go. The surest way to put a kid off something is try to to force them into a direction that doesn't interest them. Listen to Jeff! :)

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  9. Pirates? Always interesting, colourful and can be as much fun as you would like them to.

    Cheers, Ross

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  10. Morschauser's rules are very simple and give a good game in several periods. Junior General is great; I ran many games over a 3-year period for school kids, who enjoyed all of them. Losses are always by stand, and usually have only 2 figures each, so the armies are not all that hard to put together.

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  11. For what it's worth, I'm playing games with 2 of my boys at the moment using 1/72 plastics in a similar way to how I started playing. 2 sides, each with an artillery piece or catapult, and roll marbles to knock figures down......it's fantastic!

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  12. Probably need to find out what films/books he's interested in. Unlike when I was 9 warlike themes tend to be avoided other than in fantasy. Perhaps something similar to LOR or Pirates of the Caribbean. Perhaps knights or pirates with a Songs of ...... game. Short, big figures, and with decisions to be made.

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  13. if you have a local store that sells toy soldiers why not bring him there and tell him to pick out some toy soldiers that he would like, then base your game on what he picks. Maybe use "Little Wars" if you have cannons that fire.

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  14. You could always try something from Neil Thomas. I've just had a go at his Ancient and Medieval Wargaming set with my 10 year old daughter and they seemed to go quite well. There is also quite a bit of dice rolling which is always a bit of fun, although not at the bucket loads level.

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