Saturday, 25 January 2014

Meissen and easy (or not) does it all the time- with apologies to the Stranglers

In a rain lashed Tradgardland I have been experimenting with white undercoats this weekend but have not got as far as the glossy varnish yet.I have found it hard after years of black undercoats and /or washes fudging my results in my favour as I don't paint well.
No photos as my eldest is in London and has her camera with her. I have been inspired by the look of Meissen Porcelain and have found the following pictures on the web, when I have been painting-


That is what the figures remind me of and I think it is a cool connection with the 18th century.
I have also been musing on the imagination potential of that 18th Century idea of the Orient-
This Meissen figure is just crying out to be modelled in 28mm or whatever scale. Nonsense yes but fun...
Another figure in porcelain hinting at the exotic east...
It is not the East as it ever was but as it was imagined in the 18th Century.Therefore just the sort of imag-ination to add a bit of colour to our battlefields,Courts and Gardens. Finally a quaint figure I could not resist-
What do you think? Just imagine a heady mix of styles,colours,armour,beasts etc facing up your Ducal armies upon any Field of Mars...

14 comments:

  1. What oriental despot can live without a War Rhino?

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    1. Rhino for war and relaxation ,who could ask for anything more?

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  2. I love the War Rhino that is amazing and I so want one, just wish I could sculpt

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    1. Fenris games do an amazing one based upon the Durer picture.So tempting but at £9 I will have to have a think...

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  3. For me the favoured mode of locomotion is a bespectacled goat..... I suspect the original sculptor had been on the laudanum. The finish reminds me of Stokes' figures over at The Grand Duchy of Stollen.

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    1. Laudanum indeed I fear.I am reminded of Stokes work too.I wonder if Meissen was an influence there too...

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  4. I'm looking forward to seeing your finished work.

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  5. Very pretty miniatures here. Thinner washes over a white undercoat (as you say) and then glossy varnish can produce a similar look for wargaming figures. Peter GIlder and Doug Mason were the influence rather than Meissen, but it's a nice thought. ;-)

    Best Regards,

    Stokes

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  6. I know some painters around here who use thin washes over white. They've mastered it over the years. I use white primer (I could never get the hang of black), but I use more solid applications that I highlight and then apply a darker wash over that.

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  7. The "Turk" on the rhinoceros was probably to commemorate the grand tour of Clara, an Asian rhinoceros that was toured around Europe in the 18th century by a Dutch merchant who had acquired the beast in the Dutch East Indies. There's a book about it, which I read a few years ago. And interesting little story.

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  8. Those Meissen figures could cost as much as your house!

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