Tuesday, 28 December 2021

From Miniature Warfare April 1968

 I am very indebted to Ronnie for the below article-


Fascinating and news to me. I wonder if the Janissaries or Charles ll unit appeared on the table top ?

18 comments:

  1. Fabulous! And you can’t argue with that string of letters after his name either. 😄

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    1. Indeed! I only ever saw him at a distance in my SK days but he had a presence about him.

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  2. Yup, that book was an even greater influence than Featherstone though it came second.

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    1. It was one of the first I ever read. Still is an influence on my gaming.

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    2. Very true in what you both say.

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  3. And that's why my Wofun 18th-century armies are a liberal mix of '45, Marlborough and American Revolution.

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  4. Hear! Hear! Good to see one of the greats with that take on things.

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    1. So true! I feel it has given me a wee hobby boost seeing this letter.

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  5. You could write to his son or grandson and ask ...

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  6. No - forget that - confused him with Charles Grant again!

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    1. I know who you mean, no worries. I don’t know what happened to Peter Young’s collection. Did he have a son/daughter who kept them? Can anyone shed a light on this ?

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  7. One of the first sort of imaginations ?
    I believe, but am open to correction, the Brigadier commissioned painted figures and buildings.

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    1. He certainly obtained a lot of buildings/terrain from Bill Holmes of Deltorama. I'm not sure if he actually paid his figure painters!
      Ronnie

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    2. There's a good article about Deltorama on the Vintage Wargaming blog. I'd let you have a link but you know how I am about such technicalities. Should be easy to find!
      Young's figures were sold to a collector in America and it was suggested at the time that the price was never paid.
      Ronnie

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  8. That's a fascinating piece of wargames history; thanks for posting.

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